Foto

~
1
~
Spring Diaries Quilt
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
This lovely quilt is perfect for any time of year – in the spring and summer to echo
the sunny seasons, or in autumn and winter to bring a welcome splash of warm
colour. It has fifty-four circle blocks, all made the same way using templates. The
quilt uses fabrics mostly from the Spring Diaries range.
Materials
• Fabric 1: 4yd (3.7m) – Solid Off White (481012)
• Fabric 2: ⅜yd (40cm) – Sunflower Dove White (481080)
• Fabric 3: ½yd (50cm) – Garden Flowers Ocean Green (481081)
• Fabric 4: ⅜yd (40cm) – Wildgarden Honey Yellow (481082)
• Fabric 5: ½yd (50cm) – Emily Pink (481083)
• Fabric 6: ½yd (50cm) – Gerbera Pink (481084)
• Fabric 7 ½yd (50cm) – Garden Flowers Dove White (481085)
• Fabric 8: ½yd (50cm) – Ahlia Pink (481086)
• Fabric 9: ⅜yd (40cm) – Audrey Ocean Green (481087)
• Fabric 10: ½yd (50cm) – Sunflower Honey Yellow (481088)
• Fabric 11: ½yd (50cm) – Pollen Pink (481089)
• Fabric 12: ½yd (50cm) – Emily Teal (481090)
• Fabric 13: ½yd (50cm) – Audrey Honey Yellow (481091)
• Backing fabric 5yd (4.6m)
• Binding fabric ½yd (50cm) – Ahlia Pink (481086)
• Wadding (batting) 62in x 89in (157.5cm x 226cm)
• Piecing and quilting threads
• Quilting ruler, rotary cutter and mat
• Sharp fabric scissors
• Template plastic or thin card to make templates
Finished Size
54in x 81in (137cm x 206cm) approximately (after binding)
Notes
• Fabric quantities based on a usable width of 42in (107cm)
• Measurements are in imperial inches with metric conversions in brackets – use only one system
throughout (do not mix them)
• Wash all fabrics before use and press before cutting
• Use ¼in (6mm) seams unless otherwise instructed
• Read all the instructions through before you start
Quilt Layout
1 There are fifty-four blocks in the quilt. Each block is made up of two semicircles, sewn together
with two concave-shaped pieces. The fabrics used for the quilt are shown in Figure A and the quilt
layout in Figure B.
~
2
~
Figure A Fabric swatches
~
3
~
Figure B The quilt layout
Numbers indicate fabrics (see Figure A for swatches)
~
4
~
Cutting Out
1 Each block is made up of two units. Each unit is made up of a semicircle sewn together with a
concave-shaped piece. Both of these shapes are marked using Template 1 (semicircle) and Template
2 (concave shape) – see Figure C. Copy Template 1 and Template 2 to make master templates from
template plastic or thin card, making sure you copy the templates accurately.
Figure C Marking out the shapes on width of fabric strips
2 The shapes are best cut out with sharp scissors, although the straight edges could be cut with a
rotary cutter. There are four fabrics used in the quilt that have a clear pattern direction, so check
when marking the template shapes that the pattern is going in the right direction. In this quilt this
applies to Wildgarden Honey Yellow (Fabric 4), Emily Pink (Fabric 5), Gerbera Pink (Fabric 6) and
Emily Teal (Fabric 12).
3 From Solid Off White (Fabric 1) cut twenty-eight 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From
these strips mark and cut out fifty-four shapes using Template 1 (semicircle) and fifty-four shapes
using Template 2 (concave shape).
4 From Sunflower Dove White (Fabric 2) cut two 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these
strips mark and cut out four of Template 1 and four of Template 2.
5 From Garden Flowers Ocean Green (Fabric 3) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips.
From these strips mark and cut out five of Template 1 and five of Template 2.
6 From Wildgarden Honey Yellow (Fabric 4) cut two 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From
these strips mark and cut out four of Template 1 and four of Template 2. Note that the fabric pattern
has a vertical direction.
7 From Emily Pink (Fabric 5) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these strips mark
and cut out five of Template 1 and four of Template 2. Note that the fabric pattern has a vertical
direction.
8 From Gerbera Pink (Fabric 6) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these strips
mark and cut out five of Template 1 and five of Template 2. Note that the fabric pattern has a
horizontal direction.
~
5
~
9 From Garden Flowers Dove White (Fabric 7) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From
these strips mark and cut out five of Template 1 and four of Template 2.
10 From Ahlia Pink (Fabric 8) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these strips
mark and cut out five of Template 1 and four of Template 2.
11 From Audrey Ocean Green (Fabric 9) cut two 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these
strips mark and cut out four of Template 1 and four of Template 2.
12 From Sunflower Honey Yellow (Fabric 10) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From
these strips mark and cut out four of Template 1 and five of Template 2.
13 From Pollen Pink (Fabric 11) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these strips
mark and cut out four of Template 1 and five of Template 2.
14 From Emily Teal (Fabric 12) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From these strips
mark and cut out four of Template 1 and five of Template 2. Note that the fabric pattern has a
vertical direction.
15 From Audrey Honey Yellow (Fabric 13) cut three 5in (12.7cm) x width of fabric strips. From
these strips mark and cut out five of Template 1 and five of Template 2.
16 Cut the backing fabric across the width into two equal pieces. Remove the selvedges. Sew the
pieces together along the long side and press the seam open. Trim to a piece 62in x 89in (157.5cm x
226cm) – this is about 4in (10.2cm) larger all round than the quilt top, to allow for quilting and
finishing.
17 Cut the binding fabric into seven 2½in (6.4cm) x width of fabric strips. Sew the strips together
end to end and press seams open. Press the binding in half along the length, wrong sides together.
Making a Circle Block
1 There are fifty-four blocks in the quilt, all made the same way. The block is 9½in (24.1cm) square
unfinished (that is, before being sewn together with other blocks). A block is made up of two
semicircles, one in off white fabric and one in print fabric. The block background is made up of two
concave pieces, one in off white fabric and one in print fabric. The curved seam is sewn by machine
but you could hand sew it if you prefer, although the result won’t be as strong and durable.
Tip
If you haven’t sewn curved seams before it is a good idea to make a test
block before you begin making the quilt, as the technique can be a little
tricky. You will have enough spare fabric to cut two of Template 1 and two
of Template 2 to practise the technique.
~
6
~
2 Take a semicircle of Ahlia Pink (Fabric 8) and an off white concave piece and mark the centre
point and quarter points on each piece (see Figure D i) – this is most easily done by folding the
pieces in halves and quarters and finger pressing creases (or use a pencil to mark short lines or dots).
3 Place the pieces right sides together, matching up the centre marks and roughly matching the
curved edges. Pin at the centre mark and the two side edges first (see Figure D ii). Now pin at the
quarter marks and then the spaces in between, easing the fabric pieces so they fit together well, with
the curved edges matching completely (see Figure D iii). Use plenty of pins!
4 Using a ¼in (6mm) seam, sew the pieces together, stitching slowly and carefully to keep the
curved edges together, and making sure you don’t form tucks in the fabric. When the seam is sewn,
snip little cuts in the seam, about ⅛in (3mm) long (see Figure D iv). Press the seam as sewn and
then press from the back of the work, pressing the seam outwards, away from the semicircle (Figure
D v). Check the unit is 5in x 9½in (12.7cm x 24.1cm), trimming if necessary.
Figure D Sewing a curved seam
i
ii
~
7
~
iii
iv
v
5 Repeat this process to make a second unit, this time using a semicircle of off white and a concave
piece of Emily Teal (Fabric 12).
6 Sew the two units together, matching the circle seams neatly. Press the seam open or to one side
(Figure E). This is Block 1 – check the block is 9½in (24.1cm) square.
~
8
~
Figure E Sewing the two units together
7 Make the rest of the blocks using the same technique. There are twelve different fabric
combinations in the quilt and these are shown in Figure F.
• Block 1 – make five.
• Block 2 – make five.
• Block 3 – make five.
• Block 4 – make five.
• Block 5 – make five.
• Block 6 – make five.
• Block 7 – make four.
• Block 8 – make four.
• Block 9 – make four.
• Block 10 – make four.
• Block 11 – make four.
• Block 12 – make four.
Figure F Blocks needed for the quilt
Joining the Blocks
1 When all fifty-four blocks have been made and pressed, lay out the blocks in nine rows, each with
six blocks. Follow Figure G carefully, noting that some blocks need to be rotated 180 degrees. Take
time to check the layout before you begin to sew the blocks together
2 Sew the blocks together in rows, pressing seams open or to one side. If pressing seams to one side,
then press rows 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 in the opposite direction to rows 2, 4, 6 and 8.
3 Now sew the rows together, matching the seams neatly and pressing seams open or to one side.
~
9
~
Figure G Sewing the rows together
~
10
~
Quilting and Finishing
1 If you are quilting the quilt yourself you now need to make a quilt sandwich – you can do this in
various ways, as follows.
• Use large stitches to tack a grid through the layers of the quilt in both directions, with lines
about 4in (10cm) apart.
• Use pins or safety pins to fix the layers.
• Use fabric glue, sprayed onto the wadding to fix the layers together.
If you are sending the quilt off to be commercially long-arm quilted you won’t need to make a
sandwich, as this is done when the quilt is mounted on the machine.
2 When the layers of the quilt are secured, quilt as desired. You could machine or hand stitch ‘in the
ditch’ (that is, along the seams) of each patchwork piece, or echo quilt about ¼in (6mm) away from
all of the seams, or quilt diagonally across the quilt, making cross shapes through the circles. When
quilting is finished, trim excess wadding and backing and square up the quilt.
3 Use the prepared double-fold binding strip to bind your quilt. Sew the binding to the quilt by
pinning the raw edge of the folded binding against the raw edge of the quilt. Don’t start at a corner.
Using a ¼in (6mm) seam, sew the binding in place, starting at least 6in (15.2cm) away from the end
of the binding. Sew to within a ¼in (6mm) of a corner and stop. Take the quilt off the machine and
fold the binding upwards, creating a mitred corner. Hold this in place, fold the binding back down
and pin it in place. Begin sewing the ¼in (6mm) seam again from the top of the folded binding to
within ¼in (6mm) of the next corner and then repeat the folding process. Do this on all corners.
Leave a 6in (15.2cm) ‘tail’ of unsewn binding at the end.
4 To join the two ends of the binding, open up the beginning and end of the binding tails, lay them
flat and fold the ends back so the two ends touch. Mark these folds by creasing or with pins – this is
where your seam needs to be. Open out the binding and sew the pieces together at these creases.
Trim off excess fabric and press the seam. Re-fold the binding and finish stitching it in place on the
front of the quilt.
5 With the quilt right side up, use a medium-hot iron to press the binding outwards all round. Now
begin to turn the binding over to the back of the quilt, pinning it in place. Use matching sewing
thread and tiny stitches to slipstitch the binding in place all round, creating neat mitres at each
corner. Press the binding and your lovely quilt is finished.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

 

A large summer bag is great for trips to the beach and this one matches the Painting Flowers quilt. The fresh summer colors are perfect with any colored denim and a nice summer tan.

 

Painting-Flowers-Bag

 

We used the same block for the bag as we used for the Painting flowers quilt. The measurements are in inches and seem allowance is already added.

The pieces are then stitched together as shown on the right. As you can see the rectangles are pieced together in different ways.

You need two identical patchworks, one for the back and one for the front of the bag.

 

Painting-Flowers-bag-1

 

Cut two pieces for lining that are the same size as the patchwork pieces.

Sew the two patchwork pieces together as shown below. Attach wadding and backing fabric and quilt the patchwork.
The backing will not be visible because of the lining, so use something simple.

Sew the lining pieces together. Leave an opening for turning in the seem as shown on the right.

 

Painting-Flowers-bag-2

 

For the patchwork handles 4 inch wide pieces with random lengths are sewn together until each patchwork piece is 26 inches long.

Cut strips of wadding that are the same lenght (26 inches) but just 3 inches wide. Place the wadding against the back of the patchwork pieces, and iron in the fabric edges.

 

Painting-Flowers-bag-3

 

Fold the strips double so that each handle is about 1,5 inches wide, and sew along both sides.

 

Painting-Flowers-bag-4

 

Attach the handles on each side of the quilted patchwork piece with pins, as shown on the illustration on the left.

Each handle-end should be placed approximently 6,5 inch from each corner.

Place the lining right side down on top, and sew along the top and bottom edge, shown on the illustration to the right.

 

Painting-Flowers-bag-5

 

Fold the bag so that the two patchwork halves lies right side against each other, and the two lining halves lies against each other on the opposite side. The seems where the handles are attached should be in the middle. Sew along the edge on the right and left side.

Cut out a 2,5 inch square in each of the four corners.

Fold each corner opposite so that the seem is in the middle and sew across, see illustration on the right.

Turn the bag right side out trough the opening in the lining. Push the lining-half into the patchwork-half, and sew along the top of the bag, about 1/2 inch from the edge to keep the lining in place.
Sew the opening in the lining closed.

Your bag is now finished. Have a great day!

 

Summe Bag

 

It’s always nice to sew a pretty floral quilt for summer, and the Painting Flowers fabrics makes such a fresh summer quilt.

The Painting Flowers collection is a limited edition,
The simple quilt blocs makes a sort of organiced chaos patchwork and works well if you use larger bolder pattens on the larger pieces, and then smaller patterns on the smaller pieces.

The quilt measures 80,5 x 51 inch (201,25 x 127,5 cm)

 
Painting-Flowers-Quilt-Picture-1

 

 
The quilt block consists of 4 different sized rectangle shapes. The measurements are in inches and a 1/4 inch seem allowance is already added. The rectangels in the block will be pieced together in many different ways.
 
Painting-Flowers-Quilt-1
 

 

Here are the pieces you need to make the whole quilt top. The letters referes to the measurements abow, Pieces called A are 5 x 3,5 inch and so on. The number shows how many you need. Remember that seem allowance is already added to the measurements.

 

Painting-Flowers-Quilt-2

 

The rectangles are then pieced together in different ways to make two larger blocs. The letters shows you where the different sized pieces go.

You need six of block 1, three of block 2, and then tree blocs that are the equivalent of the top half of block 2.
As you can see block 2 is a mirror image of block 1.

 

Painting-Flowers-Quilt-3

 

Piece all the blocs together as shown below, and your quilt top is ready.

 

Painting-Flowers-Quilt-4

 

We suggest using the “Summer Floral Blue on White” for backing, and “Nelly green” for the edge. The quilting is done by a professional quilting servise.
Painting-Flowers-Quilt-Picture-2

A few costumers have asked us about the Patchwork Balls in the pictures. These are actually our new Paper Piece products this spring. The packages contain paper piece shapes that you cover with fabric using the Tilda Paper Piece glue pen. You can then easily sew perfect patchwork balls by hand.

There are two different packages, one with balls made of pentagon shapes, and one with balls made of biconvex shapes.
Each package come with explanations and paper pieces for 16- 20 balls in two sizes. 
All you need in addition to the paper pieces and glue are some leftover fabrics, good hand sewing thread, a needle and some stuffing.

Patchwork balls look lovely just lying in a bowl or on a platter, squeeze one into a porcelain cup and you have a nice needle cushion.
They also make cute toys, you can easily put a round bell in with the stuffing to make them jingle.


 

Foto


| Meer